​Pet Services of Gold Canyon


The air is cool, the skies are blue and we can't wait to explore the next hiking trail.


What could possibly be more enjoyable than a long and scenic hike with your canine companion?


Our own Gold Canyon area and the Superstition Mountains provide some of the most beautiful and challenging trails in Arizona (of course I am a little biased).  

TIPS FOR HIKING WITH YOUR DOG

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Our own Gold Canyon area and the Superstition Mountains provide some of the most beautiful and challenging trails in Arizona (of course I am a little biased).  


I have been hiking with my dogs for years, in many areas of the country, and have found the desert requires some special preparation. 


Here are a few things to keep in mind so you and your dog can enjoy hiking in our beautiful state for many years to come.


Conditioning your dog for the physical activity is important.  Dogs can become“couch potatoes” during the hot summer months and out of shape for winter hikes.  Start easy and work your way up to longer and more strenuous hikes.


Choose a trail that is good for both you and your dog.  Avoid trails that are extremely rocky.  A few trials to start with would be The Lost Goldmine Trail (trailhead located on Cloudview Rd), First Water Trails and many of the trails in Lost Dutchman State Park.  These are all good for beginners.


What you need to take. Maps and a compass and know how to use them! Bring enough water for you and your dog and a collapsible bowl.  Have a cell phone, needle-nosed pliers and tweezers, sunscreen for you and children’s sunscreen for your dog’s nose, snacks for you and your companion and a basic first aid kit. Make sure you have told someone where you and your dog will be hiking and when you are expected to return.


What your dog needs to take.  ID and rabies tag, collar and leash (obey trail leash laws), paw protection if you choose an exceptionally rocky trail or an extended hike, doggie bags to pick up waste.


Allow time for frequent rest and water breaks in the shade. Remember your dog is hiking with a fur coat on.  Don’t skimp on the water.  Dogs get dehydrated on car rides, much less hiking, so get used to carrying more water than you may think you need.


Make sure before hitting the trail your dog is well-trained and able to be under control whether she’s on or off leash (follow any leash rules for that area).  Besides being a courtesy to other trail users and wildlife, this protects your dog.  How better to keep her curious nose away from our 17 species of rattlesnakes, than by having her at heel?


Now, hit the trails, and enjoy some happy hiking with your dog!

These are a few tips for day hikes, for extended wilderness hiking you should take a safety course or survival course to be well prepared. 


If you have any further questions or would like to meet up with other dog owners to hike, please feel free to contact me, Kathy, at 480.652.4900 or email me at pkfabish@gmail.com.


Kathy Fabish

Pet Services of Gold Canyon